Exhibitions

Eleanor Antin: Minetta Lane—A Ghost Story

Main Gallery Apr 8–Jun 11, 1995

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Eleanor Antin: Minetta Lane—A Ghost Story
Apr 8–Jun 11, 1995

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Minetta Lane—A Ghost Story, 1995
Minetta Lane—A Ghost Story, 1995 Installation view, Santa Monica Museum of Art

In a large-scale video installation, artist and filmmaker Eleanor Antin recreated a 1950s Greenwich Village street–an elaborate, life-size stage set that viewers could enter. Audiotapes reproduced street sounds, while narrative video clips created the illusion of people inhabiting the rooms of apartments into which viewers peered, voyeur-like, spying on scenes from a reconstructed past. Minetta Lane addressed issues of personal and cultural history as it suggested the abiding struggle and loneliness of the artist in America.