Exhibitions

Jason Middlebrook: Museum Storage

Project Room 1 Dec 11, 2001–Jan 20, 2002

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Jason Middlebrook: Museum Storage
Dec 11, 2001–Jan 20, 2002

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Jason Middlebrook: Museum Storage, 2001, Installation view

The large-scale, frequently humorous installations created by New York artist Jason Middlebrook simulate natural and manmade structures and often center on the act of excavation–be it metaphorical or literal. For his project at SMMoA, Middlebrook constructed a museum storage space that functioned as a site through which to explore the idea of neglect within the institutional context. The installation presented artifacts of a fictionalized history of the museum–bubble-wrapped sculptures, discarded exhibition proposals, renovation plans, and an archival system spun out of control. Weeds and other plant matter colonized both the space and objects, producing a laboratory of growing art.